Introduction to Archaeology

Introduction to Archaeology
Studying past human behaviors and cultures by applying scientific principles and reasoning; exploring case studies concerning archaeological discoveries.
ANTHR
110
 Hours3.0 Credit, 3.0 Lecture, 0.0 Lab
 PrerequisitesNone
 TaughtFall, Winter, Spring, Summer
 ProgramsContaining ANTHR 110
Course Outcomes

Learning Objectives

Having completed this requirement, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic scientific principles which undergird the scientific process, including the strengths and weaknesses of this process, appreciate the excitement of discovery that has accompanied important scientific developments, demonstrate how scientific methodology can be used to analyze real-world science-related problems, evaluate scientific data and claims in order to make rational decisions on public-policy science issues that affect their community.express their thoughts (in oral, graphical, and written formats) on scientific topics clearly, including appropriate use of basic scientific vocabulary and effective interpretation of quantitative data, reflect rationally upon the interface between science and religion.

Learning Outcomes

This course should help students to demonstrate an understanding of the basic scientific principles which undergird the scientific process, including the strengths and weaknesses of this process. Students will learn to appreciate the excitement of discovery that has accompanied important scientific developments as well as demonstrate how scientific methodology can be used to analyze real-world science-related problems. Students will become adept at evaluating scientific data and claims in order to make rational decisions on public-policy science issues that affect their community. As students complete the course they will learn to express their thoughts (in oral, graphical, and written formats) on scientific topics clearly, including appropriate use of basic scientific vocabulary and effective interpretation of quantitative data, as well as reflect rationally upon the interface between science and religion.

Course Objectives

Upon completion students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic scientific principles which undergird the scientific process, appreciate the excitement of discovery that has accompanied important scientific developments, demonstrate how scientific methodology can be used to analyze real-world science-related problems, evaluate scientific data and claims in order to make rational decisions on public-policy science issues that affect their community, express their thoughts (in oral, graphical, and written formats) on scientific topics clearly, including appropriate use of basic scientific vocabulary and effective interpretation of quantitative data, and reflect rationally upon the interface between science and religion.