Sociology

Sociology
BS
Hours48 Credit Hours
MAPMajor Academic Plan

Program Requirements

The Sociology Department requires a minimum of 24 hours of sociology major courses to be taken in residence at BYU for this degree program. These hours may also go toward BYU's 30-hour residency requirement for graduation.
Requirement 1 Complete 1 Course
Introductory courses (to be completed preferably in sophomore year or earlier):
Note: Students must declare a sociology major before registering for Soc 307; students must complete these four courses with a C- or better grade.
Requirement 5 Complete 1 Option
Complete one of the following options in order to fulfill the GE Advanced Written and Oral Communication requirement:
Option 5.2 Complete 1 Course
Requirement 7 Complete 18.0 hours from the following Options
Complete 18 credit hours of 300-level or above Sociology courses. (No double counting within the major is allowed.)
Option 7.1 Complete 18.0 hours from the following Courses
Students are strongly encouraged to participate in one or two semesters (up to 9 credit hours) of professional experience including academic internships (on-campus, domestic, or international) and research with a faculty member (Soc 497R). Students may apply up to a total of 9 professional experience credit hours toward the sociology elective requirement. Suggested courses include Bus M 494R (On-Campus Experiential Projects), IAS 397R (Topics in IAS), IAS 399R (Academic Internship: International), Poli 399R (Academic Internship), Soc 399R (Academic Internship), Soc 497R (Directed Research in Sociology).
Program Outcomes

Major Substantive Areas of Sociological analysis

Substantive Knowledge

Graduates will ...

Be conversant with the substantive areas of sociology and the variety of theories and research methods associated with these substantive areas.

Know the major controversies and debates, new developments, emerging issues, and current trends within substantive areas.

Be able to critically assess the strengths and weaknesses of current sociological theories and research relating to substantive areas.

Sociological Perspective

Graduates will demonstrate they can apply a sociological perspective (i.e., recognize the influence of social sturcture) to individual-level or collective phenomena.

Integrating life goals and professional and career interests

Application to life

Graduates will be able to...

Integrate the knowledge and skills learned in the sociology program with life goals and professional and career interests.

Apply what they have learned in the sociology program to a real world, professional experience of at least one semester (Capstone course, Research (497R) or Professional (399R) internship,Washington Seminar,Study-abroad, Participation in Service Learning or a Community-based Program).

Diversity of social life, inequality, social conflict, power

Understanding Diversity and Inequality

Graduates will...

Learn the limitations of extrapolating from their own experience and will be able to articulate how the life experience of others may differ from their own.

Know how race, class, and/or gender intersect with other social categories to create a variety of life experiences and influence the life chances of individuals.

Be able to articulate the sources of social conflict and describe the relations of power in modern society.

Research Methodologies

Graduates will apply the appropriate qualitative or quantitative research method to address a social problem (issue, phonomena, etc.)

Theoretical perspectives that inform sociological analysis

Understanding Sociological Theory

Graduates will...

Know the basic ideas and arguments forming sociological inquiry, including philosophical foundations, philosophy of social science, and development of classical theory.

Be conversant with the major theoretical perspectives of sociology (e.g. positivism, neo-Marxism, structuralism, post modernity, feminism, etc.).

Be able to critically assess the strengths and weaknesses of each theoretical perspective.

Demonstrate that they can apply theories to understand and solve practical problems.

Diversity of research methodologies

Understanding Sociological Epistemologies

Graduates will...

Know the full range of methodologies, the basic epistemological assumptions associated with each, the criteria for evaluating quality research, and how to select and implement the appropriate method to test a hypothesis or address a research question.

Be able to estimate and interpret uni-variate and bi-variate statistics and generalize their meaning to the appropriate population.

Know how to code and interpret qualitative data or how to code and prepare quantitative data for statistical analysis.

Will have the necessary skills to analyze data and summarize findings including

  1. basic familiarity with spreadsheet programs and statistical packages,
  2. the analytic process of comparing across categories,
  3. how to chart historical trends, and
  4. how to summarize findings for written or oral presentation.

Accessing, reviewing, and analyzing sociological literature

Capstone Experiences

Graduates will...

Be able to conduct electronic bibliographic searches and determine the scientific quality of the research they find.

Be able to demonstrate their knowledge of substantive areas, theory, and research methodologies by developing an original sociological argument in writing (e.g. literature review, research proposal, theoretical analysis, etc.).

Be able to conduct electronic bibliographic searches and determine the scientific quality of the research they find.

Be able to demonstrate their knowledge of substantive areas, theory, and research methodologies by developing an original sociological argument in writing (e.g. literature review, research proposal, theoretical analysis, etc.).

Write a research paper in which they formulate a research question, identify data to answer their question, analyze data, report the results, and interpret the results.

Present their results orally at a research conference.